Sep 182014
 
how to repair shed doors

Storage shed doors can really get scary looking.

Can’t they?replacement shed doors

Over time wood swells, nails loosen, staples fail and screws lose their holding power resulting in doors that are hard to open and hard to close. Add to this the fact that most sheds will settle into their footprint throwing it off level and making the doors just about inoperable.

As each hard pull or push to open or close occur, the doors get weaker becoming even more difficult to operate.

To the unskilled home owner, a crummy looking set of shed doors may indicate it’s time to get a new shed.

To the experienced home owner with some DIY skills, it’s any easy inexpensive repair job compared to buying new  doors.


In our opinion, even the unskilled shed owner can repair their doors with a little time and a few replacement parts.

New replacement wooden doors will range in price from $299 for 48″ doors up to ab0ut $350 for 60″ doors. Using the shed rescue kit, doors can be renovated with new heavy duty hardware and a few trim pieces for a savings of over 70% over the cost of new!!!!

The shed door is made using a rectangle frame with the shed siding on top of the frame and the trim on top of the siding. Some manufacturers who ship their buildings in boxed kits (big box type stores sell these), short change the frame by using a partial inside frame and using the outside trim as part of the frame resulting in a less bulky package making it easier and less expensive to ship.

In just a short time, to the dismay of the purchaser, the doors will become problematic because they are the only mechanical item in the shed used multiple times through out any day. Every time the door is opened or closed, a certain amount of stress is placed on the fasteners and the joints and if they are sub-par quality for the sake of packaging, failure will occur sooner than later.

Determine why the doors are hard to use

Doesn’t make sense to repair your doors without alleviating the problem. Start with checking the level of the floor. Do it along all 4 sides a few times on each side. Get a sense of the low spots and the high spots and decide if you want to lower the high or raise the low. We suggest raising the low as it’s easier but make the decision for your particular circumstance.

We have fuller details on another page but in a nutshell you need a jack (car or 4 wheeler jack) or a fulcrum to lift your shed and shims to place under. Cut regular flat shingles into about 6″ squares and use as many as needed. Or buy cedar or composite shims at your local home improvement store. A package of shims are nice to have around the house so buy a few extra packages.

For a simple but decent foundation place patio blocks at the ends and in the middle of each 4×4 runner. Jack up the shed and use your shims between the bottom of your runner and the top of the patio block (or what ever type you used). If your runners are sitting on the ground and you don’t want to use patio blocks (big mistake), than shim between the bottom of the runner and the grass/gravel.


Once your have your shed level, the doors should swing freely and stay closed or open with very little assistance/resistance. If they don’t, all the joints and fasteners need to be tightened to pull the door together. If the wood siding, trim or frame pieces have rotted or swelled, they’ll need to be replaced. The Shed Door Rescue Kit has all the information you need to replace any trim, siding or frame pieces.

We suggest  removing the doors from the shed and using a set of horses as your work table to work on your doors.

Check the backside frame for loose nails, staples or screws. If using a cordless drill, be careful not the spin the screws as they’ll lose their holding power. If you do or if you can’t tighten a screw, move down or up a little and place another screw there. Reinforce screws with a few nails and/or reinforce nails with a few screws.

As you check for loose hardware, look over the siding and the frame/trim pieces. Are they all solid and in good condition? If not, measure the pieces and purchase the material needed to replace them.

If your hinges are worn, that could cause some sagging. Hinges have to be able to hold up the weight of the door which is another good reason to make sure the wood stays dry; it’s a lot lighter!

For more tips about keeping your door from warping, this post about door care will give you some great ideas.

And to help take care of your floor, read this post about keeping your shed floor dry.

 

 

 

 

 Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

(required)

(required)

*